Manufacturer of Boiler & Cooling Water Treatment Chemicals

Archive for the ‘News and Events’ Category

Green and healthy schools

The Center for Green Schools at USGBC was founded in 2010 with a vision to put every child in a green school within this generation. The very week of its founding, I moved to Washington, D.C., to bring to a national scale the work I’d been doing with the Recovery School District in New Orleans.

Through my work in that district, I had learned that healthy and safe learning environments cannot be taken for granted. I had also grown to understand that, every time a community builds a school, it has the chance to tell its children that they are valued. Over the nine years I’ve worked with USGBC, I have been privileged to be able to help many communities make good choices for their students’ futures.

The energy and leadership that USGBC has invested in the green schools movement has paid off, and our commitment remains strong. We believe the mission we’ve set forth is about lifting people up and making our world not just more environmentally friendly, but more equitable. Everyone, from the kindergartener to the Ph.D. student, deserves to attend schools that sustain the world they live in, enhance their health and well-being and prepare them for 21st century careers as global sustainability citizens. Our mission is about building a green future for all, regardless of one’s social or economic background.

“As part of our vision for 2020, USGBC has committed to investing in the future by developing the full potential of the diverse, committed and passionate people who power our movement,” says Mahesh Ramanujam, President and CEO of USGBC and GBCI. “And we know that one crucial way to achieve that is through empowering our movement’s future leaders. By ensuring that children all over the world have the opportunity to learn in a green school, we will lay this foundation. So let’s keep striving to build a better world for our children, their children and generations yet to come! That’s how we’ll achieve the world we’ve imagined.”

Anisa Heming in New Orleans

 

Where we learn matters

My experience with schools and school districts in nearly all 50 states and several countries outside of the United States has given me a litany of reasons why green schools matter. It’s an easy question to answer when you have been in both the worst schools imaginable and the most inspiring learning environments in the world. By the numbers, schools have an enormous impact on people and the environment. Globally, 1 in 8 individuals set foot in a school each day. There are over 130,000 schools in the U.S., occupying square footage equivalent to half that of the commercial building sector. It is clear that where we learn matters, and better schools have the potential to improve the lives of millions around the world.

A school’s curriculum, pedagogy, operations, culture and learning environment are all connected. Green schools serve as hands-on educational tools for students to learn about green building and sustainability. The real-world, project-based learning that sustainability education provides prepares students to discover new solutions for our global challenges, and we can best educate students for a sustainable world by modeling it for them at their own school.

We also know that green school buildings are critical for student and teacher health. The importance of facilities to student health, wellness and performance is well established, and research also tells us that responsible investment in school buildings can lead to thriving local communities. Green schools support community health by reducing harmful emissions, minimizing environmental impact, saving energy and water while reducing utility costs, reducing waste going to landfill and lessening the burden of extraction of new natural resources for construction and operations.

Nothing beats results

Since 2010, the Center for Green Schools has sustained volunteer action in every U.S. state and educated thousands at our annual Green Schools Conference and Expo. We have inspired acts of service to benefit over 7 million students during Green Apple Day of Service with almost one million volunteers across 73 countries. We launched Learning Lab, a platform for K–12 sustainability curriculum content, which now hosts over 500 high-quality lessons in English and Spanish. LEED Lab, a course to teach the LEED rating system to college and university students by giving them hands-on certification experience, is now offered in 25 institutions in nine countries around the world. As of October 2017, we have more than 12,100 certified and registered LEED K–12 and higher education schools projects.

We have reinforced our belief that healthy learning environments lead to thriving communities with the publication of original research and policy analysis, and we have increased the introduction of green schools legislation in U.S. states fivefold. Our staff and volunteers have worked to establish the U.S. Department of Education’s Green Ribbon Schools award program in dozens of states, strengthening the program’s “three pillars” of a green school as unifying criteria for the movement. This criteria is now used by organizations in 25 countries through our Global Coalition for Green Schools.

Anisa Heming at Green Schools Conference

Anisa Heming at the Green Schools Conference and Expo. Photo credit: coolgreenschools.com.

Finally, we have been the primary voice for a new job class, the K–12 sustainability director, providing professional development to a growing network of 120 school district staff who collectively serve over 7.5 million students. We have established Green Schools Fellowships and school district scholarships to successfully institutionalize sustainability positions in school districts.

What’s next for the Center

The Center sits at the forefront of USGBC’s drive to broaden our message about the impacts and benefits of green buildings. As the Center for Green Schools’ Director, I approach the work with the knowledge that schools are central to our communities and our future. Our children’s schools are of interest to the public in a way that few other buildings are. Additionally, schools have the potential to prepare students to care for and sustain the world in which they live, taking on their future careers with a mindset rooted in sustainability.

I am excited that, with USGBC’s tools and the new Arc platform, schools and school stakeholders can benchmark their performance, access important educational resources, find inspiring examples of success, and connect with and learn from each other. High-quality tools enable passionate people to do transformational work, and these tools will help the green schools movement go further.

Building on this foundation, the priorities of the Center for Green Schools over the next three years are to

  • Prepare students for a sustainable future by influencing the value of sustainability within mainstream education and serving sustainability education online.
  • Engage communities for impact by driving engagement in sustainability at school and leading and educating green school champions.
  • Guide policy and investment by advocating for school facility equity, encouraging investment in green school facilities globally and influencing school system practices and policies.

We will leverage USGBC’s considerable strengths to maximize the work of the Center for Green Schools and bring the green schools movement into its next phase. Through all of this work together, we will grow the audience for green schools and provide a launching pad for schools around the world to do great things for their students’ futures—because where we learn matters.

USGBC urges preservation of greenhouse gas measure

USGBC has submitted a public comment urging the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration to keep in place the current greenhouse gas (GHG) measure for federal highways. This message came in response to a proposed rulemaking that would repeal the measure, which requires state transportation departments and metropolitan planning organizations to monitor on-road vehicle emissions and set targets for improvement.

The GHG measure applies to state and metro area transportation agencies that receive federal funding and is one of a suite of performance measures. The current rule does not impose any specific limit, but rather identifies on-road vehicle emissions as among the metrics appropriate for evaluating overall transportation system performance.

DOT initially suspended the GHG measure, which eight states then challenged in a lawsuit. Notably, each of the states—which included California, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington—argued that they have the duty to protect their residents from the adverse effects of climate change. California, the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit, cited its own legislatively mandated targets for emissions reductions, as well as the state’s particular vulnerability to the consequences of high GHG emissions.

The built environment, which encompasses transportation systems and commercial, residential and industrial buildings, was responsible for 60 percent of total U.S. GHG emissions in 2015, according to the U.S. EPA. Tracking these emissions is essential to making our cities and states more livable, healthy and green—especially since you can’t manage what you don’t measure.

LEED strongly supports GHG emission reduction through innovative and mindful design and implementation, including LEED credits that offer incentives to accommodate non-motorized modes of transportation and green vehicles, as well as rewarding strategies that provide access to reliable public transit.

USGBC will continue to monitor all transportation performance-measure rulemakings, in order to support ways for society to measure and understand externalities imposed by our built environment.

LEED-certified schools hits 2,000

Take a look at the trends tallied by the Center for Green Schools upon the 2,000th LEED certification of a school.
For years, the Center for Green Schools at USGBC has kept a close eye on the way that K–12 schools interact with or purchase the resources and products that USGBC provides. It’s one way to tell how well the benefits of green building are reaching schools and school districts, and it also tells USGBC when we need to do some research to improve the solutions we’re offering.

Just recently, we reached a major milestone: 2,000 LEED-certified K–12 schools.

True to our LEED standards, our 2,000th school, the Rio Grande High School in Albuquerque, New Mexico, operates with high levels of sustainability. With on-site renewable energy, the use of low-emitting materials and reduction in water use, among other features, the Rio Grande High School earned LEED Gold certification.

With thousands of schools becoming certified, there’s a wealth of sustainability trends to observe. Here are some we’ve been noting:

Public schools are leading. These 2,000 projects represent well over $30 billion in investment. They also cover a total of 160 million square feet of education space, approximately 2 percent of the total square footage of all U.S. public schools. Public schools make up the vast majority of LEED certification commitments, driven by either state laws or by the desire of school districts to show good stewardship of tax dollars.
Large districts make large-scale commitments. Typically, when we take a look at LEED-certified projects by large/medium public school district size, we see large districts with big capital campaigns at the top. Over the last couple of years, Houston Independent School District and Washington, D.C., Public Schools have risen in numbers quickly as they dive fully into their bond projects. They’ve overtaken Albuquerque Public Schools, whose recent capital campaign is winding down, and Chicago Public Schools.

Looking at the numbers another way, within the large/medium public school district group, we see that Cincinnati Public Schools and South-Western City Schools, both in Ohio, have huge percentages of schools that have achieved certification. In both cases, nearly 40 percent of all schools in the district are certified, constituting a major commitment and commendable effort.
Some states distribute funding to assist smaller districts. The state-level data tells another angle of the national story because it highlights the state of Ohio’s commitment to LEED certification for all of its schools. Just over 300 schools have been certified in Ohio, more than double the number certified in the second-place state, California. The certified schools in Ohio are distributed around the state, reflective of the state’s commitment to assist smaller, less-wealthy school districts with needed capital construction funds.
The places using LEED are geographically diverse. The list of top states for LEED-certified schools emphasizes the broad appeal of green schools and green building practices. The top six states for LEED in schools are Ohio, California, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Maryland and Florida. Schools are seeing the value of the third-party verification that LEED provides—whether rural, urban, suburban on the coast or inland.

Guess what colleges empower students through sustainability and education

Published on 2 Nov 2017
Written by Mary Schrott

Learn about two honorable mention recipients of the Climate Leadership Awards.

For this year’s Climate Leadership Awards, USGBC and Second Nature received numerous applications from colleges and universities all making valiant strides toward sustainability in their classrooms and communities.

Georgia Southern University, in Statesboro, Georgia, and Bristol Community College, in Fall River, Massachusetts, received honorable mentions as four- and two-year institutions, respectively.

Student-driven sustainability at Georgia Southern

What sets Georgia Southern apart from other institutions are its efforts to empower students through sustainability initiatives. One such initiative is Georgia Southern’s Student Sustainability Fee Grant Program. More than $1.1 million has been allocated toward campus sustainability projects since the grant’s inception in 2014. This annual grant gives students the opportunity to lead personal sustainability projects with the guidance of faculty and staff. Past projects have ranged from LED lighting upgrades to solar-powered golf carts.

“Students are an incredible force,” says Dr. Lissa Leege, Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Sustainability at Georgia Southern. “They bring many new ideas to the table from a wide range of experience and across disciplines. Give them support, guidance, and responsibility, and they will move mountains.”

Part of the guidance Georgia Southern provides comes from the requirement that every student take an environmental studies course before graduation. The university believes that this provides students with the critical thinking and empowerment needed to make a positive environmental change outside of the classroom. One example of hands-on, student-led programming is a solar energy project in which Georgia Southern students track data on solar radiation—data that is then used to influence solar initiatives in the community.

Georgia Southern University offers student sustainability projects

Georgia Southern also collaborates with the city of Statesboro to bring treated wastewater to campus to reuse as irrigation. The only university in the state to irrigate with reuse water, Georgia Southern is known for its water conservation measures. This reuse system conserves as much as 200,000 gallons in a single hot day in the summer and allows for adaptation during periods of drought.

Thousands of students at Georgia Southern also participate in environmental service learning projects, through which they’ve donated tens of thousands of hours of service to the environment in the local area. Georgia Southern believes that the combination of classroom learning and service experience will equip their students with the skills to implement sustainability strategies in the future.

This push for sustainability education not only empowers students but helps the university save. Leege suggests that sustainability has tremendous economic value for their university.

“Investment in sustainable technologies such as LED lighting can significantly reduce energy expenses over time, but have hidden benefits such as waste reduction and risk mitigation,” says Leege. “Sustainability is also an excellent recruitment tool and adds value well beyond its initial cost.”

Sustainability degree program implemented at BCC

USGBC and Second Nature also recognized Bristol Community College (BCC) for its dedication to combating climate change on the campus level and instilling a firm sense of stewardship among its students. Similar to Georgia Southern, BCC prioritizes education in sustainability as a tool for positive environmental change.

Recently, BCC implemented a Sustainability Studies program that allows for either a liberal arts degree or a certificate in sustainability. Joyce Brennan, Vice President of the College of Communications at BCC, says this program offers an entry into the societal challenges and opportunities offered by climate change, resource consumption, and energy use.

BCC believes that an education incorporating social science-based sustainability best prepares students for the ecological realities facing society and enables them to apply sustainability knowledge at work, at home, and in the community.

Project at Greenbuild

Greenbuild is the world’s largest conference and expo dedicated to green building. It is the go-to place for the industry to convene and shape the future of the green building and sustainability movement.

This year, the Investor Confidence Project (ICP) and Investor Ready Energy Efficiency (IREE) certification will be featured throughout the conference. ICP is a global underwriting standard for developing and measuring energy efficiency retrofits and is administered through GBCI. Subject matter experts will be on hand and at the GBCI Certification Work Zone (booth #1238) for technical help and to answer questions about IREE certification and training. Register to attend one of the exciting sessions on energy efficiency financing:

  • Driving Investment in Energy Efficiency (Thurs., November 9, 10:30–11:30 a.m.): Whether you’re a firm looking for more financing options, an investor looking for quality, pre-certified projects or a program administrator looking to attract high-quality contractors, private investors and projects, ICP’s nearly $5 billion Investor Network is seeking projects to invest in. Hear about IREE certification and how it can help businesses and programs, and learn how ICP can help differentiate projects as leaders in the energy efficiency field.

Transportation Industry is Embracing Sustainability

Washington, D.C.—(Oct. 19, 2017)—Today, USGBC released its LEED in Motion: Transportation report, which focuses on industry growth in the green building sector for transportation facilities like airport terminal buildings, train stations, bus centers, seaports, light rail stations, control towers and more. The report also highlights some of the most impressive LEED-certified transportation facilities throughout the world.

“Transportation facilities often have high operating costs, water and energy usage and waste, making their impact on our daily lives and the environment immense,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president, and CEO, USGBC. “By implementing LEED green building strategies, these high-intensity buildings become efficient, cost-effective and sustainable transportation facilities that have a significant positive impact on our economy, environment, wellbeing, and productivity. As this sector continues to grow, strengthening its green footprint is imperative to ensure a sustainable future for all.”

Transportation is one of the biggest drivers of CO2 emissions and also has the highest growth in CO2 emissions from any industry sector. Globally, in 2010, the transportation sector accounted for approximately 14 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions—fourth only to the agriculture, electricity, and industrial sectors. In the U.S., transportation accounted for 27 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions in 2015—second only to electricity production.

The International Air Transport Association expects 7.2 billion passengers to fly in the year 2035—almost double the number of air passengers that traveled in 2016 (around 3.5 billion). As the number of visitors to transportation facilities continues to grow, the potential human, economic and environmental benefits of building LEED-certified transportation facilities are significant. Currently, there are airport projects registered and certified in nearly all 50 U.S. states and in more than 40 countries and territories around the world – totaling more than 201.4 million square feet of space.

The LEED in Motion: Transportation report highlights how LEED practices and strategies are flexible, easy to implement, generate impressive results and can be integrated throughout a building’s lifecycle, leading to a high performance in human and environmental health. Incorporating LEED includes sustainable site development, water conservation, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality. In February 2017, USGBC and GBCI announced a new LEED green building rating system pilot designed to suit the unique needs of transit systems on a global scale. LEED v4 O+M: Transit will allow operational transit facilities to earn LEED certification.

LEED in Motion: Transportation is the latest in a series of reports from USGBC designed to provide a holistic snapshot of the green building movement in international markets. The report equips green building advocates with the insight and perspective to understand the use of the globally recognized LEED rating system and to make a strong case for sustainable building activity.

300 years of water management in Boston

Ahead of WaterBuild, learn a bit about the history of water management in Boston.

Water has played a critical role in shaping Boston since the city’s founding. From the earliest settlers to today’s developers of high-performance green buildings, managing water has been a consistent theme for Bostonians and for leaders of the Bay State.

At Greenbuild 2017, the WaterBuild summit digs deep into the topic of water infrastructure in Boston by keeping three themes in mind: sustainability, resilience, and risk. Attendees will discuss equity, quality and technology and how they each intersect with water and modern society. Before you join us for education and connection, here’s some background on Boston’s water history

A waterworks is born

The Pilgrims relocated from Charlestown to Boston in order to access a clean source of fresh water for their community. As the population grew and the spring could no longer supply the residents with ample resources, the first private waterworks system in the New World was created.

Using wooden pipes, reservoirs were able to supply water for everyday consumption. In 1796, entrepreneurs created the Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Company with the hope of providing water to all Bostonians. The aqueduct was relatively expensive and relied on gravity for distribution, which meant that due to elevation, residents in the North End and Beacon Hill areas were at a disadvantage, as well as those who did not have the financial means to take advantage of this service. Interestingly, those at higher elevation were also at a lower risk for other water resilience hazards that are prevalent today.

Serving the public good

The 1820s marked the beginning of the discussion for implementing a public municipal water system. This conversation lasted several decades, due to competing interests, but in 1848, a municipal system was established to serve the city. It would be called Boston Water Works.

The need for safe water grew exponentially as more immigrants migrated to Boston. In 1895, the Metropolitan Water Act created a new approach for supplying water to towns within 10 miles of the state house, which was the birthplace of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA). This system continues to serve over 2.5 million people in the greater Boston area.

It wasn’t until the 21st century that the original aqueduct was reinforced with a redundant line to help supply ample water to 61 communities in and around Boston. The 17.6-mile, $665 million projects, called the Metrowest Tunnel, is now increasing water flow into Boston.

A fresh look

Boston’s water history is long and complex. At WaterBuild, professionals from Boston, across the industry, and around the world will talk about water risks and opportunities in 2017 and beyond. Join us there to learn more from some of the brightest minds in the fields of resilient and sustainable community planning, water cycle management, risk mitigation and green building.

Conserving water and energy with Green Apple Day of Service

Did you know that a significant amount of a school’s budget is dedicated to energy and water costs? Behind salaries, energy is the biggest expense for schools. Additionally, 25 percent of the energy a typical school uses is wasted, according to the EPA. Through their Green Apple Day of Service project in 2016, students at Boston Arts Academy learned about water and energy conservation. Additionally, the school wanted to explore the types of sustainable features they might include in their new building, which was in the design phase.

Boston Arts Academy Green Apple Day of Service project

The Boston Arts Academy audited their school’s water and energy usage with the help of the architects for the new building, HMFH Architects. A group of environmental science students calculated their school’s water usage from everyday activities, such as flushing the toilet or washing their hands. Then, they conducted an energy audit to calculate the amount of energy wasted throughout the school, specifically when the appliances were off and compared different light sources’ efficiency.

Boston Arts Academy Green Apple Day of Service project

After gathering the data, the students decided to convert the school’s energy usage into pounds of coal. They calculated that it takes 1,300 pounds of coal to power the lights in one classroom for 180 days. The students were surprised to discover how much water and energy is wasted every year in the school, and made commitments to be more thoughtful in their water and electricity usage.

The students’ eagerness to create change within their school was carried over into the design of the school’s new building. Along with HMFH Architects, Boston Arts Academy is working to make their new building as energy- and water-efficient as possible.

Want to find out if your school could improve its water and energy usage? Check out our specific tips and resources for projects to Reduce Water Use and Reduce Energy Use.

Leadership Awards at Greenbuild China

SHANGHAI – (October 13, 2017) – Today, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the creators of the LEED green building program, announced Dalian Wanda Group, Shougang Group Co., Ltd., and Mr. Cai Fangming as the 2017 Greenbuild Leadership Award recipients. The awards will be presented for the first time in China as part of the inaugural Greenbuild China conference and exposition. The awards ceremony will take place at the conference in Shanghai on Oct. 18.

The Greenbuild Leadership Awards recognize exceptional organizations and individuals at the forefront of the green building movement. It recognizes contributions to China and the green building community that work to enhance environmental performance and improve quality of life.

“Dalian Wanda Group, Shougang Group Co., Ltd., and Mr. Cai Fangming are dedicated to helping transform our built environment and their efforts are an inspiration to us all,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president and CEO, USGBC and Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI), the organization that certifies all LEED projects worldwide. “As China continues to take bold steps to drive green growth, these leaders are encouraging the adoption of green business practices and we look forward to honoring their efforts at Greenbuild China.”

The 2017 Greenbuild China Leadership Awards recipients’ achievements include:

  • Dalian Wanda Group is the world’s largest property company and one of China’s strongest advocates of sustainable building. As a USGBC strategic partner, they are committed to advancing green and healthy buildings and cities through the use of LEED and Wanda’s Huiyun system to support efficient building management.
  • Shougang Group Co., Ltd. is one of China’s largest steel companies and a Fortune 500 company. As a USGBC and GBCI partner, the organization is working to expand LEED in China and advance green building education and workforce development. Through the adoption of LEED and the WELL Building Standard, Shougang Group hopes to achieve a “green Beijing” that serves as a national example of green innovation.
  • Mr. Cai Fangming is a driving force and advocates for the adoption of green building technology that reduces carbon emissions and conserves environmental resources. Under his leadership, the Shanghai Expo Urban Best Practices Area has emerged as a green building innovation and earned the project LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) precertification in 2013.

To support China’s pivotal sustainability efforts, Greenbuild China will bring together global industry leaders, experts and frontline professionals dedicated to sustainable building. The conference will take place October 17-18 providing two days of inspiring speakers, invaluable networking opportunities, and industry showcases. The conference provides a forum for the green building community to unite and address some of the world’s most pressing issues, including air quality, human health, energy use and global climate change. Workshops will explore the LEED green building program and its impact, as well as other GBCI green business programs, such as WELL and the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES) for land design and development. Registration is open and attendees must register at http://greenbuild.usgbc.org/china.

Clean Power

Even without the CCP, energy efficiency is still the way forward.

The fate of the Clean Power Plan, the federal regulation of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel electric power plants, has taken a turn for the worse this month. The EPA has issued a notice of proposed rulemaking, beginning the process to repeal the rule.

The proposal would change the EPA’s interpretation of the Clean Air Act and reflects the position of the current administration that the Clean Power Plan exceeded EPA’s authority. Litigation over this action is certain, and it will feature a debate over the legal limits on EPA regulatory power balanced against the legal mandate for EPA to regulate carbon dioxide as a pollutant endangering public welfare, as found by the Supreme Court in 2009.

Market shifts away from fossil fuels

Whatever the fate of the plan, the U.S. power sector is already shifting toward less carbon-intensive energy sources. The 2017 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook reported that since 2005, the power sector has shrunk its carbon footprint by 24 percent. A new analysis suggests that the sector’s emissions are already on track to meet the Clean Power Plan’s target of 32 percent by 2030, with a projected 27 to 35 percent reduction below 2005 levels.

This decarbonization is all without the Clean Power Plan having come into effect—but how? The power sector has been influenced by state policies and shifts in relative costs among energy sources, including cheaper natural gas, which has a significantly lower carbon impact than coal. From 2005 to 2016, according to the Factbook, the U.S. added 78GW of wind, 39GW of solar and 104GW of natural gas, while retiring 49GW of coal-fired power plants.

In the void—whether temporary or permanent—left by the federal Clean Power Plan regulation, we will continue to see market forces pushing decarbonization of power generation. Some states will move ahead with steps to accelerate that transition and to use power more efficiently, with approaches ranging from California’s cap and trade program, to a diverse set of states, including Ohio and Illinois, leveraging renewable portfolio standards. Some utilities will continue to increase their investments and transition to lower carbon generation.

States left without a critical mechanism for efficiency

Under a Clean Power Plan repeal, we will be missing a key, if imperfect, tool to incentivize robust energy efficiency programs in every state. The rule would have allowed states to leverage energy efficiency for credit by avoiding the need for electricity generation and the associated emissions, with special emphasis on low-income communities.

Although leading states have adopted policies to push efficiency and its financial benefits to various sectors, other states have lagged, especially those in the Southeast and Midwest. (See, for example, ACEEE scorecards ranking energy efficiency policies in states and major utilities.) Without state and utility structures supporting efficiency, business and residential customers will continue to spend more money on electricity than they need to, and miss out on co-benefits to health and comfort. USGBC is concerned in particular about the disproportionate impact of energy costs on low-income households.

The Clean Power Plan story is not over yet, but with or without the plan, we will continue to advocate for strong, effective state and utility policies and programs to drive improvements in energy efficiency that supports jobs, businesses and families.

Page 3 of 25«12345»1020...Last »

LEED Certification

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a non profit organization that certifies sustainable businesses, homes, hospitals, schools, and neighborhoods. USGBC is dedicated to expanding green building practices and education, and its LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System™.

Chemline, Inc. is a member of The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and has the potential to provide LEED points.