Manufacturer of Boiler & Cooling Water Treatment Chemicals

Archive for February, 2015

The Top 10 States for LEED Green Building Per Capita in Nation

Published on 4 Feb 2015Written by Marisa Long Posted in Media

Illinois leads among all states for the second consecutive year; newcomers Georgia and Arizona show momentum with LEED in the South and Southwest

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) released its annual list of the Top 10 States for LEED, the world’s most widely used and recognized green building rating system, ranking states in terms of square feet of LEED space per state resident. The per-capita list highlights states throughout the country that are making significant strides in sustainable building design, construction and transformation. LEED-certified spaces use less energy and water resources, save money for families, businesses and taxpayers, reduce carbon emissions and create a healthier environment for residents, workers and the larger community.

“Every story about a green building is a story about people,” said Rick Fedrizzi, CEO and founding chair, USGBC. We commend the business and community leaders, policy makers and green building professionals in each of these states for making the commitment to create a healthier, more sustainable future.”

Now in its fifth year, the per-capita list is based on 2010 U.S. Census data and includes commercial and institutional green building projects that were certified throughout 2014. Illinois retained its top national position for the second year in a row, with 174 LEED certifications representing 3.31 square feet of LEED-certified space per resident.

Two newcomers to the list, Georgia and Arizona, show that 2014 was a year of major growth for LEED in the South and Southwest regions of the country, while the continued strong performance of Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia have helped the mid-Atlantic region remain the epicenter of green building across the country. Washington, D.C., which is not included on the official list of top states due to its status as a federal territory, is notable as it continues to lead the nation with 29.44 square feet of space per resident certified in 2014. Maryland and Virginia finished third and fourth respectively and both states increased their per capita totals to 2.70 and 2.33 square feet of LEED space per resident in 2014.

The full ranking is as follows:

Rank State Projects certified in 2014 Square feet LEED certified in 2014 Per-capita square footage
1 Illinois 174 42,457,254 3.31
2 Colorado 102 15,816,498 3.15
3 Maryland 132 15,583,423 2.70
4 Virginia 150 18,617,712 2.33
5 Massachusetts 99 14,662,950 2.2
6 Hawaii 30 2,657,808 1.95
7 California 517 69,762,936 1.87
8 Georgia 87 17,748,781 1.83
9 Minnesota 39 9,511,684 1.79
10 (tied) Arizona 82 11,152,201 1.74
10 (tied) New York 250 33,691,209 1.74
* Washington, D.C. 102 17,716,622 29.44

*Washington, D.C. is not ranked as it is a federal district, not a state.

USGBC calculates the list using per-capita figures as a measure of the human element of green building, allowing for a fair comparison of the level of green building taking place among states with significant differences in population and, accordingly, number of overall buildings.

More than 26,600 projects representing 3.6 billion square feet of space have been LEED-certified to date, with another 42,000 projects representing 8.8 billion square feet in the pipeline for certification.

 Marisa Long

Public Relations & Communications Director U.S. Green Building Council

USGBC staff

 

LEED Spans 833 Million Square Feet of Green Building Space in India

Published on 4 Feb 2015Written by Marisa Long Posted in Media

Nine out of 10 senior industry executives in India anticipate LEED-related work to increase between now and 2019

New Delhi, India (Feb. 4, 2015) – The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) announced today that Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) comprises 833 million square feet of green building space in India. The announcement was made at The Energy Resource Center’s (TERI) 2015 Delhi Sustainable Development Summit (DSDS) where USGBC’s President & Founding Chair Rick Fedrizzi and its COO, Mahesh Ramanujam, spoke.

 

The DSDS theme is centered on how businesses will lead India’s energy, water and food security. The dialogue will lead to a blueprint of actions that will help embed the concepts of social and shared value in view of the new business paradigm for Indian companies. Because LEED-certified buildings are part of the solution for energy savings, carbon mitigation and water conservation, LEED will be featured throughout the program, including a speech from USGBC’s Fedrizzi.

 

“The solutions we need from our built environment require the full participation of the business community if we are to make progress against climate change, drive energy efficiency and the development of a diverse portfolio of energy resources that includes renewables, conserve precious water, and improve human health ,” said Fedrizzi. “LEED buildings have proven to be a big part of that solution, especially in a country like India where energy efficiency is so critical and the human health impacts of rapid growth are significant.”

 

According to USGBC’s recently released LEED in Motion: India report, nine out of 10 industry senior executives in India anticipate LEED-related work to increase between now and 2019. Indian companies are using LEED to save energy, water and other precious resources.

 

“The success of LEED in India could not be possible without the hard work of hundreds of LEED professionals working daily to accelerate the widespread adoption of LEED,” added Ramanujam. “This advancement is expected to continue.”

 

A recent survey found that 87 percent of green building professionals across the country believe the number of LEED projects in India will expand rapidly in the immediate future.

Marisa Long

Public Relations & Communications DirectorU.S. Green Building Council

USGBC staff

 

Green Schools National Conference: One voice, one movement

 

Published on 30 Jan 2015Written by Rachel GutterPosted in Center for Green School

At last year’s Green Schools National Conference, USGBC and GSNN called upon all who were assembled to speak with one voice and act as one movement. They have spent the last 11 months living that promise and learning that when we speak and act as one community, we accomplish so much more.

The Center for Green Schools at USGBC has teamed up with the Green Schools National Network (GSNN) to make this fifth annual Green Schools National Conference the best yet.

Since 2010, GSNN has hosted the preeminent convening of green schools thought leaders and champions across the nation, connecting educators, non-profits, corporations and elected officials to advance our shared mission. This year, the Green Schools National Conference will be powered by USGBC and its award winning events team, best known for growing the Greenbuild International Conference and Expo into the largest green building event in the world, drawing 20,000-30,000 attendees to the platform annually.

GSNN and USGBC comprise a powerhouse team to amplify one voice and grow the conference into a force for change.

Join them in Virginia Beach, VA, from March 4-7, for the most collaborative and inspiring Green Schools National Conference yet!

Together, renew the commitment to speak and act with one voice and one movement. Why? Because this is our children’s future and we only get one chance.

Rachel Gutter

Senior Vice President, Knowledge U.S. Green Building Council

Member employees, USGBC staff

 

Green Schools National Conference

 One voice, one movement

Published on 30 Jan 2015Written by Rachel GutterPosted in Center for Green School

At last year’s Green Schools National Conference, USGBC and GSNN called upon all who were assembled to speak with one voice and act as one movement. They have spent the last 11 months living that promise and learning that when we speak and act as one community, we accomplish so much more.

The Center for Green Schools at USGBC has teamed up with the Green Schools National Network (GSNN) to make this fifth annual Green Schools National Conference the best yet.

Since 2010, GSNN has hosted the preeminent convening of green schools thought leaders and champions across the nation, connecting educators, non-profits, corporations and elected officials to advance our shared mission. This year, the Green Schools National Conference will be powered by USGBC and its award winning events team, best known for growing the Greenbuild International Conference and Expo into the largest green building event in the world, drawing 20,000-30,000 attendees to the platform annually.

GSNN and USGBC comprise a powerhouse team to amplify one voice and grow the conference into a force for change.

Join them in Virginia Beach, VA, from March 4-7, for the most collaborative and inspiring Green Schools National Conference yet!

Together, renew the commitment to speak and act with one voice and one movement. Why? Because this is our children’s future and we only get one chance.

Rachel Gutter

Senior Vice President, Knowledge U.S. Green Building Council

Member employees, USGBC staff

 

A plaque for global performance

 

Published on 30 Jan 2015Written by Scot Horst Posted in Industry

UK-based design magazine Wallpaper selected the LEED Dynamic Plaque as the winner of its Design Award for Urban Sustainability. You can view their beautiful interpretation of the plaque on their website or for their February issue.

The LEED Dynamic Plaque was showcased. London made a fitting location for display because the plaque was created for an international audience. Not only does the LEED Dynamic Plaque monitor your building’s performance, it does so in the context of buildings around the world. The software reveals local and global averages for building performance, based on a reference set of buildings that are using the plaque or sharing their performance data with us. This system allows you to compare how buildings perform in New York, Stockholm, New Delhi, Shanghai and Sao Paulo… and everywhere else.

This alignment is similar to the evolution of time-keeping in a previous century: in the U.S., prior to the transcontinental railroad, each town had its own clock and timekeeper, and each kept time differently. But when the railroad connected all the towns, it became essential to have a universal clock in order to maintain a common schedule. Consider this in the context of building performance: the LEED Dynamic Plaque provides a common score and a clear indication of how buildings around the world are performing. By using the LEED Dynamic Plaque, your project data will help set a global standard for building performance, inspiring those who fall behind to improve, and those who lead the way to push farther.

Scot Horst

Chief Product Officer U.S. Green Building Council

 

AWT Annual Convention and Expositions

The Association of Water Technologies (AWT) Annual Convention and Exposition continues to grow and evolve each year. With interactive sessions that provide you with additional industry knowledge, as well as lots of ways to network with your peers, the Annual Convention is an extremely valuable educational opportunity for all water treatment professionals.

  • Great Educational Sessions — You’ll walk away with skills that can have an immediate effect on the future direction of your business — and impact your bottom line.
  • Networking — The convention is a perfect time to meet leading experts in the field and build long-term relationships.
  • Exposition Hall — You will learn about the latest advances in the industry and see demonstrations of products and technologies that are changing the field of water treatment.

Upcoming Conventions and Expositions

2015 Annual Convention and Exposition
September 9-12, 2015
Omni Nashville and New Music City Center
Nashville, Tennessee

 

Kill the Cup:

Kill the Cup: coffee, selfies, and environmental impact

Published on 10 Dec 2014 Written by Drew Beal  Posted in Center for Green Schools

Did you know that 50 billion paper cups get discarded in America each year? It’s unbelievable!

In 2008, Starbucks established a goal to serve 25% of all drinks in reusable cups. Customers received discounts for bringing personal tumblers, and environmental messaging helped raise awareness about waste reduction. Three years later, however, the reusable rate had yet to crack 2%. In a world where climate change is our biggest challenge, less than 1 in 50 people bring a reusable coffee cup to Starbucks. What gives?

Well, the answer has something to do with behavioral science. During a 2004 experiment, door hangers were placed on houses in an attempt to inspire energy conservation. Each door hanger said something different. Money, environment, good citizenship—none of those made a difference.

A fourth sign, however, made a significant impact in changing behavior. What did it say? “The majority of your neighbors are undertaking efforts on a daily basis to reduce their energy consumption.” How’s that for keeping up with the Joneses?

At Kill the Cup, we’re applying the same methodology to reusable cups. If we’re serious about changing behavior, we have to make it fun and inclusive.

So that’s what they did when they started Kill the Cup: People are encouraged to bring a reusable cup when they got coffee and then they upload photos to Kill the Cup website. Each photo served as entry into weekly and grand prize raffles, and we published photos and leaderboards to establish social norms around reusable behavior.

This last October, student teams from eight universities competed in the inaugural Kill the Cup University Challenge. Student ambassadors received training and resources on social entrepreneurship, and implemented their own four-week grassroots campaign. During the 20-day challenge we received over 2,200 reusable cup selfies from 1,260 cup-killers! In addition to the environmental benefits, we awarded $5,000 in social impact grants to fund sustainability projects at each of the winning schools.

Kill the Cup is excited to scale the size and impact of the program, and early registration is now open for the 2015 University Challenge. Do you have what it takes to be the nation’s next great cup-killer? Sign up now to be among the first to receive information on next year’s challenge. It’s going to be a lot of fun!

Drew Beal

 

American Airlines Arena:

First sports venue to achieve LEED Gold recertification

Published on 22 Jan 2015 Written by Jay Mehta Posted in Industry

The Miami Heat has never shied away from being the first to try something or set the bar. While most will think this applies only on the court, our continued efforts in environmental sustainability prove that this mindset extends off the basketball court as well.

Back in 2009, the Miami Heat were in a neck-in-neck race with the Atlanta Hawks to become the first NBA facility to earn the prestigious LEED certification. Five years later, the same tenacity gives the honor of AmericanAirlines Arena being the first sports and entertainment facility in the world to earn LEED Gold recertification.

Attaining recertification is in and of itself a massive accomplishment. The fact that they surpassed the initial goal of LEED Silver and reached LEED Gold is the cherry on top of the proverbial sundae.

The irony that the first recertified sports and entertainment facility in the world is in Miami and not on the west coast is not lost on us.

So, just how did this 15-year-old, one-million-plus-square-foot arena outperform newer facilities that have been built and designed to meet LEED’s rigorous standards? It wasn’t always easy. Sports and entertainment facility managers understand that fluctuating operating hours and occupant densities, untraditional floor plans and the quantity of equipment sometimes makes it hard to apply LEED certification rating systems in our facilities. It is no easy feat to earn LEED certification and even more daunting to pursue recertification—it is truly a team effort.

the initial certification was unexpected because, although they were making environmentally conscious decisions, it was mostly out of a sense of fiscal responsibility. Conservative consumption, particularly in the areas of energy and water, made fiscal sense.
The recertification, however, was much more deliberate. Maintaining LEED certification became a company-wide initiative. They became vocal about sustainability measures to their sponsors and partners. In turn, they became extra sets of eyes and ears to monitor the market for new products, and to ensure that internal policies of recycling and sustainable purchasing were followed.
Some examples of these team efforts include:

Sports are one of the few activities that unify us; where ideologies are left at the door. There’s no political affiliation, no socio-economic status, no racial tensions or religious doctrine between fans. Sports become a powerful ally when this sense of unity can be harnessed and directed towards a common goal. Our goal is to change the perception that Miami is not environmentally conscious and inspire sustainable practices in our community, leading by example.

In 2014, PollStar ranked the AmericanAirlines Arena as the #1 busiest arena in Florida, 5th in the U.S. and 20th in the world. Reaching even a fraction of our 1.6 million guests can lead to substantial change in the environment.

 Jay Mehta

Solution Architect U.S. Green Building Council

USGBC staff

 

2015 Building Energy Summit:

 How technology is taking green buildings to the next level

Published on 22 Jan 2015Written by Darlene Pope Posted in Industry

Green is good. It’s good for the environment, and it’s good for business. In the real estate business, having a “green building” means constructing and operating it in a way that benefits the environment—and also benefits the bottom line.

But there’s only so much energy efficiency that can be achieved through equipment upgrades and behavior modification. In order to achieve maximum efficiency in building operations, you need to automate much of the manual operations that take place today.

Scheduling building systems to operate based on full occupancy on the same time schedule every day is not an efficient operational plan. Relying on each tenant to manually turn their lights on and off (when they actually should be on and off) is not an efficient lighting control solution. Simultaneously heating and cooling space to maintain a comfortable 72 degrees is not an efficient temperature control method.

So, how does technology benefit your green building program? It identifies inefficiencies that may otherwise go unnoticed, and allows the building systems to optimize themselves based on actual conditions (weather, occupancy, cost of energy). How often are offices heated and cooled when the space is vacant?

For the greatest amount of efficiency and savings, green buildings need to combine efficient materials and equipment (hardware) with intelligent controls and applications (software). These technologies give building operators real time information needed for real time savings.

Intelligent buildings are buildings that take advantage of technology and integration to maximize performance and efficiency. Running a building based on thousands of real-time data points, plus advanced algorithms and operational analytics, transforms the facility from a static environment to a dynamic, interactive asset that automatically conforms to the needs of its owners and occupants.

Technology can take those thousands of complex data points and turn them into simple, readable, actionable items. It can even execute on those actionable items without relying on manual processes. That’s the only way to achieve maximum operational efficiencies—and to be able to measure and verify both environmental impact and savings.

2015 Building Energy Summit

Register now to attend the 2015 Building Energy Summit being held on March 25, 2015, in Washington, DC.

This year’s Summit will focus on how to combine your green initiatives with advanced technology applications in order to achieve the greatest environmental and economic benefits for your buildings. Join the country’s top building owners and managers—such as JLL, Colliers, CBRE, Akridge, Hilton Worldwide, GSA, Skanska, MetLife, TIAA-CREF, Deutsche Bank, City of Houston, Microsoft, Brandywine, Saks, Marriott, Hines, Kilroy Realty, Lincoln Harris, Home Depot, Forest City, Shorenstein, Principal Financial Group and more—along with leading technology providers and energy services companies, to find out how to super-charge your energy efficiency program (excuse the pun) and take green buildings to the next level.

Darlene Pope

President & CEO CoR Advisors

 

 

 

Sense and Survivability: How evolution shapes design decisions

Published on 9 Jan 2015Written by Sam Pobst Posted in Education

The 3.8 billion years of evolution of the DNA strand that uniquely identifies the human genome has invested in humanity a host of sensory inputs that are essential to our survival. This distinctive combination of skills has made Homo sapiens the single most efficient predator on the planet. We possess an exceptional set of sensors from which we extract many subtle cues from our environment, providing us with constant reassurance of our safety. If our building designs do not satisfy our innate security interests, then we feel disconnected.

Various theories and hypotheses about the interaction between man, nature, and the built environment have been proposed. Biophilia references the spiritual aspect of a visual contact with nature. Eco-psychology submits that contact with nature extends a bond that provides sensations of harmony, balance, and stability. Environmental psychology addresses the psychological responses we have to environmental stresses, and proponents have performed studies on the effect of the built environment on human behavior.

Humans thrive in many harsh environments from the desert to the arctic. We have designed and built protective shelters unique to each of these environments to facilitate our survival. From these shelters we obtain security, comfort, convenience, and efficiency. The scientific community lists as many as 21 acquired sensory traits in humans, with many appearing to be subsets of the five senses of taste, touch, smell, hearing, and vision. In addition to these five familiar traits, breathing is relevant as a sixth sense as it relates to how we design our buildings.

The need to satisfy these elemental instincts is no more a discussion of nature vs. nurture than learning to cry or breathe is a response to a sharp whack by an obstetrician. Removing your hand from a heat source is not a learned response. The smell of bread baking in the oven is not a learned response. Tastes of bitter, sweet, salty, and sour are not learned, but serve to sharpen our survival skills. Addressing these most basic instincts in our building designs provides for our sense of security.

Each of these six sensory inputs has an impact on how we design and operate our buildings on an elemental level that exceeds what can be derived from a spiritual or psychological influence. As we think of these senses, they are so primal that we are unconscious of their origin and impact. We taste because we have taste receptors, we feel the touch of heat and cold because we have a neuro-chemical response to those influences. We see, hear, and breathe from the moment we are born with no thought to the implications. We have responses to each of these sensory inputs that affect our survival and are hardwired into our essence.

Sam Pobst

Principal Eco Metrics LLC

Pro reviewers, Chapter members, Member employees, USGBC faculty

 

LEED Certification

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a non profit organization that certifies sustainable businesses, homes, hospitals, schools, and neighborhoods. USGBC is dedicated to expanding green building practices and education, and its LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System™.

Chemline, Inc. is a member of The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and has the potential to provide LEED points.