Manufacturer of Boiler & Cooling Water Treatment Chemicals

Archive for May, 2017

Tucson leads in green building with Emerging 2030 District (USGBC Arizona)

Published on 5 May 2017 Written by Michael Peel Posted in Community

USGBC Arizona feted the public launch of the Tucson Emerging 2030 District at the historic Hotel Congress on April 20 with a sold-out tour and networking reception. The dynamic partnership between USGBC Arizona and the emerging district began in 2015 with the support of USGBC volunteers using USGBC’s ADVANCE framework.

This work catalyzed the rapid development of an impressive district in downtown Tucson in just over a year. The April 20 event celebrated this success and engaged local building owners, managers and developers.

Meeting the national 2030 Challenge on a local level

The Tucson Emerging 2030 District is the first of its kind in Arizona, and part of the national Architecture 2030 Challenge. This member-based organization consists of real estate owners, managers, developers, industry professionals and community stakeholders who work toward substantially reducing the environmental impact of building construction and operations. This, in turn, contributes to Tucson’s resurgent economy.

The 2030 District’s public-private partnership brings property owners and managers together with local governments, businesses and community stakeholders to provide a business model for urban sustainability through collaboration, leveraged financing and shared resources, improving the health and welfare of Tucson and its citizens.

Recognizing a need to support education and subject matter expertise for building owners and managers in the district, USGBC Arizona connects volunteer subject matter experts with district participants to benchmark their properties using Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager. With this data, teams develop and implement creative strategies, best practices and verification methods for measuring progress toward a common goal: the Architecture 2030 Challenge targets of 50 percent reduction in energy use, water use and transportation emissions by the year 2030.

Celebrating at the Hotel Congress

The tour and reception on April 20 highlighted this work, as well as the impressive green features of the Hotel Congress, one of the early Tucson Emerging 2030 District participants. Hotel Congress was named “Arizona’s Greenest Workplace 2016” in Arizona’s Greenest Workplace Challenge and is now a Gold Level Green Leader on TripAdvisor.

Their green initiatives include:

Sourcing local/sustainable ingredients for their restaurant

Using Refresh Glass upcycled from wine bottles

Eliminating as many straws as possible as a part of the One Less Straw campaign with One More Generation

Switching to 100 percent recycled paper coasters that are compostable

Converting to compostable drink cups

Providing guests with solar-heated water

2017 AWT ANNUAL CONVENTION and EXPOSITION

September 13-16, 2017

Devos Place and Amway Grand Plaza Hotel

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Five Reasons You Should Attend

AWT’s Annual Convention and Exposition continues to grow each year, yet it still remains the perfect size for professionals in our industry. With over 1,200 attendees, the meeting provides you with plenty of opportunities to increase your business connections and resources, while it maintains its exclusive focus on industrial water treatment.

Here are a few other reasons why you should attend the 2017 Annual Convention and Exposition being held in Grand Rapids, Michigan:

  1. 98% of past attendees say they return to the office with practical knowledge they can implement immediately.
  2. 93% of past attendees say the convention increases their industry knowledge.
  3. Since 2010, attendance has grown by more than 21%—exposing you to more individuals with whom you can network.
  4. Attendees are viewed as one of the biggest assets of the convention. The convention’s noncompetitive atmosphere allows you to share your experiences, challenges, and concerns.
  5. It’s the only convention where you’ll find exhibitors whose sole focus is industrial water treatment.

ASSOCIATION OF WATER TECHNOLOGIES

Sea View community in New York City ties sustainability to human health

Published on 28 Mar 2017  Written by Meghan Hazer  Posted in Industry

Sea View Healthy Communities builds health into the design of the neighborhood.

Sustainable design, once unconventional, has become the norm for many developments. Health-promoting design is emerging as a new trend, due in part to the realization that how we build matters—not just in terms of environmental sustainability, but also in terms of human health. Pioneering projects are now engaging in a new type of health-focused design.

One of those pioneers, Sea View Healthy Communities, is the subject of a Request for Expression of Interest (RFEI) recently released by the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC). Initially developed as a tuberculosis facility, the hundred-year narrative of Sea View’s history in the context of its future vision reflects the public health community’s shift in focus from infectious to chronic disease. This shift was discussed by NYCEDC’s Munro Johnson in a recent blog published through our colleagues at the Build Healthy Places Network.

When asked by the Staten Island borough president to create a “health and wellness campus,” NYCEDC initially envisioned state-of-the-art health care facilities and residential communities for the disabled. This is not surprising, as health care facilities often come to mind when discussing health in the context of real estate development. However, the RFEI for Sea View takes a different approach by striving to develop Sea View instead as a healthy community, with explicit requirements to promote health through both design and operations.

It’s a unique ask, especially at the neighborhood scale. Munro Johnson, Vice President of NYCEDC, and Tommy Boston, Project Manager at NYCEDC for the Sea View Project, describe how they got there.

From health care to health promotion

The new focus on developing a “healthy community” was informed by data collection and cross-sector collaboration. According to Johnson, NYCEDC began with a medical services demand analysis and was surprised to find very low demand for additional medical facilities. In spite of having several highly ranked health care facilities, NYEDC discovered, the Staten Island borough has the highest mortality rate in New York City, specifically due to chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Johnson explains that this “paradox led us to the doorstep of healthy communities research and healthy communities design, and the current vision that we are working with for the project.” Johnson continues,“the original underlying policy objective [is] better health. Based on the numbers and the data, the best way to achieve that turned out not to be building a bunch of gleaming new health care facilities, but rather by building health into the design of a neighborhood.”

Health and sustainability side by side

In addition to health, the RFEI also includes sustainability goals. The NYCEDC team explained that requiring a focus on sustainability performance is viewed as a nonnegotiable, standard feature in procurement. For Sea View, Johnson referred to health and sustainability as “a natural match,” stating that “part of the nature of sustainable design is to surface what is happening in the environment in order to be better stewards of it—and living with a better relationship to nature is intrinsically healthy in most cases.” Boston added, “I think that the physical sustainability of the built environment in Sea View will comingle with the individual sustainability of its residents and inhabitants.”

This inclusion of health alongside sustainability in the “ask” for Sea View makes a bold statement, challenging the development community to consider what’s next for health and sustainability, and how we will define high-performing sites in the future.

 

AWT 2017 Convention and Exposition

2017 ANNUAL CONVENTION & EXPOSITION

SEPTEMBER 13-16, 2017

DEVOS PLACE AND AMWAY GRAND PLAZA HOTEL

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN

Five Reasons You Should Attend

AWT’s Annual Convention and Exposition continues to grow each year, yet it still remains the perfect size for professionals in our industry. With over 1,200 attendees, the meeting provides you with plenty of opportunities to increase your business connections and resources, while it maintains its exclusive focus on industrial water treatment.

Here are a few other reasons why you should attend the 2017 Annual Convention and Exposition being held in Grand Rapids, Michigan:

  1. 98% of past attendees say they return to the office with practical knowledge they can implement immediately.
  2. 93% of past attendees say the convention increases their industry knowledge.
  3. Since 2010, attendance has grown by more than 21%—exposing you to more individuals with whom you can network.
  4. Attendees are viewed as one of the biggest assets of the convention. The convention’s noncompetitive atmosphere allows you to share your experiences, challenges, and concerns.
  5. It’s the only convention where you’ll find exhibitors whose sole focus is industrial water treatment.

SAVE THE DATE

ASSOCIATION OF WATER TECHNOLOGY

Top four benefits of installing solar panels on your home

Published on 5 Apr 2017 Written by Taryn Holowka Posted in Industry

Solar panels are a great way to offset energy costs, reduce the environmental impact of your home and provide a host of other benefits, such as supporting local businesses and contributing to energy independence.

  1. Reduce or eliminate energy bills.

This one is pretty amazing. In Washington, D.C., which has an average amount of sun, but it’s enough to power a house of three kids and two adults at net zero energy consumption.

Even if you live somewhere cloudy, such locations typically receive more than two hours of sunlight per day, while sunny locations receive an average of 5.5 hours of sunlight per day.

Although sunny days will produce more solar energy, solar panels will continue to draw energy even when the weather is cloudy. Indirect, or diffused, sunlight will still help to power your home. Cloudy days usually produce around 10 to 20 percent of the power generated on sunny days.

  1. Earn tax credits and rebates.

To start, you will get 30 percent of total system costs back from equipment and installation as a federal income tax credit when you file your taxes. This means you would save $7,500 on a solar system worth $25,000.

Combine this with state and local rebates and Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SRECs), and total costs can be cut in half. The SRECs are generated throughout the year, and you can sell them to utility companies, which generates a very impressive return on the initial investment.

The investment has a payback period of only 3.5 years, while the solar panels have a warranty of 10 years and useful life of 25 years—which means you generate free electricity and extra credits for 20+ years.

  1. Start saving from day one.

Annual energy costs can be in the thousands.

Solar panels significantly improve your resale value. Most home buyers understand what a home with solar panels means—especially because the system is already in place and they didn’t have to make the initial investment and installation. According to research, most homeowners see a $5,911 resale value increase per installed kilowatt. That means if you install a 3.1 kilowatt system, you could improve your home’s resale value by nearly $18,000.

 4. Help the environment and help us all.

Solar power systems derive clean, pure energy from the sun. Installing solar panels on your home helps combat greenhouse gas emissions and reduces our collective dependence on fossil fuel. Traditional electricity is sourced from fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas. When fossil fuels are burned to produce electricity, they emit harmful gases that are the primary cause of air pollution and global climate change. Not only are fossil fuels bad for the environment, but they are also a finite resource. Because of this, the price is constantly fluctuating and can increase in a short period of time.

Solar power also works during a drought or heat wave  During heat waves or severe droughts, electricity generation is at risk. But solar power systems do not require water to generate electricity.

In addition, solar power creates jobs in clean energy. The U.S. has been leading the world in clean energy.

LEED Certification

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a non profit organization that certifies sustainable businesses, homes, hospitals, schools, and neighborhoods. USGBC is dedicated to expanding green building practices and education, and its LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System™.

Chemline, Inc. is a member of The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and has the potential to provide LEED points.