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Archive for November, 2017

Guess what colleges empower students through sustainability and education

Published on 2 Nov 2017
Written by Mary Schrott

Learn about two honorable mention recipients of the Climate Leadership Awards.

For this year’s Climate Leadership Awards, USGBC and Second Nature received numerous applications from colleges and universities all making valiant strides toward sustainability in their classrooms and communities.

Georgia Southern University, in Statesboro, Georgia, and Bristol Community College, in Fall River, Massachusetts, received honorable mentions as four- and two-year institutions, respectively.

Student-driven sustainability at Georgia Southern

What sets Georgia Southern apart from other institutions are its efforts to empower students through sustainability initiatives. One such initiative is Georgia Southern’s Student Sustainability Fee Grant Program. More than $1.1 million has been allocated toward campus sustainability projects since the grant’s inception in 2014. This annual grant gives students the opportunity to lead personal sustainability projects with the guidance of faculty and staff. Past projects have ranged from LED lighting upgrades to solar-powered golf carts.

“Students are an incredible force,” says Dr. Lissa Leege, Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Sustainability at Georgia Southern. “They bring many new ideas to the table from a wide range of experience and across disciplines. Give them support, guidance, and responsibility, and they will move mountains.”

Part of the guidance Georgia Southern provides comes from the requirement that every student take an environmental studies course before graduation. The university believes that this provides students with the critical thinking and empowerment needed to make a positive environmental change outside of the classroom. One example of hands-on, student-led programming is a solar energy project in which Georgia Southern students track data on solar radiation—data that is then used to influence solar initiatives in the community.

Georgia Southern University offers student sustainability projects

Georgia Southern also collaborates with the city of Statesboro to bring treated wastewater to campus to reuse as irrigation. The only university in the state to irrigate with reuse water, Georgia Southern is known for its water conservation measures. This reuse system conserves as much as 200,000 gallons in a single hot day in the summer and allows for adaptation during periods of drought.

Thousands of students at Georgia Southern also participate in environmental service learning projects, through which they’ve donated tens of thousands of hours of service to the environment in the local area. Georgia Southern believes that the combination of classroom learning and service experience will equip their students with the skills to implement sustainability strategies in the future.

This push for sustainability education not only empowers students but helps the university save. Leege suggests that sustainability has tremendous economic value for their university.

“Investment in sustainable technologies such as LED lighting can significantly reduce energy expenses over time, but have hidden benefits such as waste reduction and risk mitigation,” says Leege. “Sustainability is also an excellent recruitment tool and adds value well beyond its initial cost.”

Sustainability degree program implemented at BCC

USGBC and Second Nature also recognized Bristol Community College (BCC) for its dedication to combating climate change on the campus level and instilling a firm sense of stewardship among its students. Similar to Georgia Southern, BCC prioritizes education in sustainability as a tool for positive environmental change.

Recently, BCC implemented a Sustainability Studies program that allows for either a liberal arts degree or a certificate in sustainability. Joyce Brennan, Vice President of the College of Communications at BCC, says this program offers an entry into the societal challenges and opportunities offered by climate change, resource consumption, and energy use.

BCC believes that an education incorporating social science-based sustainability best prepares students for the ecological realities facing society and enables them to apply sustainability knowledge at work, at home, and in the community.

Project at Greenbuild

Greenbuild is the world’s largest conference and expo dedicated to green building. It is the go-to place for the industry to convene and shape the future of the green building and sustainability movement.

This year, the Investor Confidence Project (ICP) and Investor Ready Energy Efficiency (IREE) certification will be featured throughout the conference. ICP is a global underwriting standard for developing and measuring energy efficiency retrofits and is administered through GBCI. Subject matter experts will be on hand and at the GBCI Certification Work Zone (booth #1238) for technical help and to answer questions about IREE certification and training. Register to attend one of the exciting sessions on energy efficiency financing:

  • Driving Investment in Energy Efficiency (Thurs., November 9, 10:30–11:30 a.m.): Whether you’re a firm looking for more financing options, an investor looking for quality, pre-certified projects or a program administrator looking to attract high-quality contractors, private investors and projects, ICP’s nearly $5 billion Investor Network is seeking projects to invest in. Hear about IREE certification and how it can help businesses and programs, and learn how ICP can help differentiate projects as leaders in the energy efficiency field.

Transportation Industry is Embracing Sustainability

Washington, D.C.—(Oct. 19, 2017)—Today, USGBC released its LEED in Motion: Transportation report, which focuses on industry growth in the green building sector for transportation facilities like airport terminal buildings, train stations, bus centers, seaports, light rail stations, control towers and more. The report also highlights some of the most impressive LEED-certified transportation facilities throughout the world.

“Transportation facilities often have high operating costs, water and energy usage and waste, making their impact on our daily lives and the environment immense,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president, and CEO, USGBC. “By implementing LEED green building strategies, these high-intensity buildings become efficient, cost-effective and sustainable transportation facilities that have a significant positive impact on our economy, environment, wellbeing, and productivity. As this sector continues to grow, strengthening its green footprint is imperative to ensure a sustainable future for all.”

Transportation is one of the biggest drivers of CO2 emissions and also has the highest growth in CO2 emissions from any industry sector. Globally, in 2010, the transportation sector accounted for approximately 14 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions—fourth only to the agriculture, electricity, and industrial sectors. In the U.S., transportation accounted for 27 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions in 2015—second only to electricity production.

The International Air Transport Association expects 7.2 billion passengers to fly in the year 2035—almost double the number of air passengers that traveled in 2016 (around 3.5 billion). As the number of visitors to transportation facilities continues to grow, the potential human, economic and environmental benefits of building LEED-certified transportation facilities are significant. Currently, there are airport projects registered and certified in nearly all 50 U.S. states and in more than 40 countries and territories around the world – totaling more than 201.4 million square feet of space.

The LEED in Motion: Transportation report highlights how LEED practices and strategies are flexible, easy to implement, generate impressive results and can be integrated throughout a building’s lifecycle, leading to a high performance in human and environmental health. Incorporating LEED includes sustainable site development, water conservation, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality. In February 2017, USGBC and GBCI announced a new LEED green building rating system pilot designed to suit the unique needs of transit systems on a global scale. LEED v4 O+M: Transit will allow operational transit facilities to earn LEED certification.

LEED in Motion: Transportation is the latest in a series of reports from USGBC designed to provide a holistic snapshot of the green building movement in international markets. The report equips green building advocates with the insight and perspective to understand the use of the globally recognized LEED rating system and to make a strong case for sustainable building activity.

300 years of water management in Boston

Ahead of WaterBuild, learn a bit about the history of water management in Boston.

Water has played a critical role in shaping Boston since the city’s founding. From the earliest settlers to today’s developers of high-performance green buildings, managing water has been a consistent theme for Bostonians and for leaders of the Bay State.

At Greenbuild 2017, the WaterBuild summit digs deep into the topic of water infrastructure in Boston by keeping three themes in mind: sustainability, resilience, and risk. Attendees will discuss equity, quality and technology and how they each intersect with water and modern society. Before you join us for education and connection, here’s some background on Boston’s water history

A waterworks is born

The Pilgrims relocated from Charlestown to Boston in order to access a clean source of fresh water for their community. As the population grew and the spring could no longer supply the residents with ample resources, the first private waterworks system in the New World was created.

Using wooden pipes, reservoirs were able to supply water for everyday consumption. In 1796, entrepreneurs created the Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Company with the hope of providing water to all Bostonians. The aqueduct was relatively expensive and relied on gravity for distribution, which meant that due to elevation, residents in the North End and Beacon Hill areas were at a disadvantage, as well as those who did not have the financial means to take advantage of this service. Interestingly, those at higher elevation were also at a lower risk for other water resilience hazards that are prevalent today.

Serving the public good

The 1820s marked the beginning of the discussion for implementing a public municipal water system. This conversation lasted several decades, due to competing interests, but in 1848, a municipal system was established to serve the city. It would be called Boston Water Works.

The need for safe water grew exponentially as more immigrants migrated to Boston. In 1895, the Metropolitan Water Act created a new approach for supplying water to towns within 10 miles of the state house, which was the birthplace of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA). This system continues to serve over 2.5 million people in the greater Boston area.

It wasn’t until the 21st century that the original aqueduct was reinforced with a redundant line to help supply ample water to 61 communities in and around Boston. The 17.6-mile, $665 million projects, called the Metrowest Tunnel, is now increasing water flow into Boston.

A fresh look

Boston’s water history is long and complex. At WaterBuild, professionals from Boston, across the industry, and around the world will talk about water risks and opportunities in 2017 and beyond. Join us there to learn more from some of the brightest minds in the fields of resilient and sustainable community planning, water cycle management, risk mitigation and green building.

LEED Certification

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a non profit organization that certifies sustainable businesses, homes, hospitals, schools, and neighborhoods. USGBC is dedicated to expanding green building practices and education, and its LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System™.

Chemline, Inc. is a member of The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and has the potential to provide LEED points.