Manufacturer of Boiler & Cooling Water Treatment Chemicals

Posts Tagged ‘LEED’

USGBC Announces LEED Homes Award Winners

Annual recognition highlights projects, developers, and builders leading the residential market in sustainable development

Washington, D.C.—(Sept. 12, 2017)—Today, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) announced the recipients of its annual LEED Homes Awards, which recognizes projects, architects, developers and homebuilders who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and innovation in the residential green building marketplace.

The LEED Homes Award recipients include multi-family, single-family and affordable housing projects and companies that are trailblazers in the residential sector and have prioritized incorporating sustainability within their projects in 2016.

“Homes provide more than just shelter. As demonstrated by the slate of LEED Homes award recipients, LEED homes improve the health and well-being of the occupants while saving energy, environmental resources, and money,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president, and CEO, USGBC. “This year we praise the innovative and integrative LEED Homes’ honorees for advancing the residential green building movement.”

The awards also recognize the “LEED Homes Power Builders,” which USGBC developed to honor an elite group of developers and builders that have exhibited an outstanding commitment to LEED and the green building movement within the residential sector. In order to be considered as a LEED Homes Power Builder, developers and builders must have LEED-certified 90 percent of their homes/unit count built in 2016. Homes at any LEED certification level—Certified, Silver, Gold or Platinum—are eligible for consideration.

LEED Homes Award Recipients:

Project of the Year: Hassalo on Eighth, Portland, Ore.

Developed by American Assets Trust, designed by GBD Architects and constructed by Turner Construction, Hassalo on Eighth is a LEED Platinum mixed-use, dense development that creates a vibrant, 24-hour neighborhood for people to live, work and play. With more than a million square feet of new construction spread across three buildings, this project covers apartments, parking, an outdoor urban plaza and North America’s largest bike hub with space for 900 bicycles. Site-specific strategies include rainwater harvesting and treatment; on-site wastewater treatment and re-use with infiltration; district energy; natural daylighting and access to public transportation.

Outstanding Single-Family Project: Right-Sized Passive Home, Oak Park, Ill.

Designed by Tom Bassett-Dilley Architect, constructed by Evolutionary Home Builders and verified by Eco Achievers, the Right Sized Passive Home is a LEED Platinum home. Nontoxic, no-added formaldehyde, water-borne finishes, and materials were selected carefully for this project helping it become sustainable. This home also has its own energy monitoring system so the owners and designers can track energy use compared to modeled predictions.

Outstanding Single Family Developer: (Tie) John Marshall Custom Homes, Davidson, N.C.and Koral and Gobuty Development Co, LLC., Bradenton, Fla.

John Marshall Custom Homes continue to be a leader in sustainable building. Last year the firm developed a “pocket neighborhood” of 15 homes in Davidson, N.C. Currently, 12 of these homes have achieved LEED Silver certification while the remaining are waiting for certification and construction completion. The walkability of this community is one of its biggest attractions as it sits within a five-minute walk of the elementary school, park, shops and public library.

Koral and Gobuty Development Co, LLC are the developers of Mirabella, an innovatively designed, eco-conscious neighborhood of 160 paired villas created for active adults (55+). As of today, 72 Mirabella homes have achieved LEED Platinum certification – 100% of the community’s building stock. Mirabella currently has an additional 37 homes under construction and 51 lots remaining, with plans to have those 88 properties also earn the same level of LEED certification.

Outstanding Multi-Family Project: Arete, Kirkland, Wash.

Built by Natural & Built Environments and developed by Sustainable Kirkland, LLC, five buildings make up the Arete community that earned LEED Platinum status last year. This is the first micro-apartment project in the city of Kirkland and consists of living, working and art-centered spaces. Energy performance is one of the greatest successes for this community as some buildings surpass 40 percent savings over the LEED baseline. Additional energy features include solar hot water providing 40 percent of annual demand, triple pane windows, blown-in-blanket insulation, advanced air sealing, 100 percent LED lighting, efficient central ventilation, and 96 percent efficient boilers with radiant in-floor heat.

Outstanding Multi-Family Developer: AMLI Residential – Dallas, Texas, Austin, Texas, Sunrise, Fla., Chicago, Ill.

Since 2006 all of AMLI Residential’s new construction buildings have been built at the minimum to LEED Silver standards. In 2016 AMLI’s portfolio grew to contain 25 LEED certified projects, which represents more than one-third of the developer’s properties. AMLI created a habitat for native pollinators and utilized LEED as an opportunity to create regenerative landscaping. AMLI has several other projects currently targeting LEED and wishes to grow their portfolio past 50 percent LEED certified in the coming years.

Outstanding Affordable ProjectProspect Plaza Site One, Brooklyn, N.Y.

Developed by Oceanhill LLC and built by Blue Sea Development, Prospect Plaza Site One is the first site to be completed in a three-block project that will provide 394 units of modern, human-scaled, affordable housing. Site One is LEED Platinum certified and consists of 110 units of sustainable, energy efficient, healthy housing in four attached townhouse style buildings and a mid-rise elevator building. Prospect Plaza received the first national affordable housing Active Design Verified certification from The Partnership for a Healthier America and is the subject of a Mt. Sinai School of Medicine clinical study on long-term health benefits of living in a green building.

Outstanding Affordable Developer Builder / Developer: Habitat for Humanity, Kent County, Mich.

In 2016 Kent County’s Habitat for Humanity chapter built 15 homes earning LEED certification—10 receiving Gold and five Silver. To date, Habitat Kent has built 158 LEED-certified homes. On average, Habitat Kent’s LEED certified homes save homeowner’s $67.12 per month over an average Michigan home. Habitat Kent also partners with Grand Rapids Public School and Grand Rapids Community College to provide professional green construction experience to the next generation workforce.

LEED Homes Power Builders (*Represents a company that also won a LEED Homes Award):

  • AMLI Residential*
  • Blue Sea Development Company, LLC*
  • Frankel Building Group
  • Forest City
  • Gerding Edlen
  • Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte
  • Habitat for Humanity of Kent County*
  • Habitat for Humanity Grand Traverse
  • Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services
  • Jamboree Housing Corporation
  • John Marshall Custom Homes*
  • Koral and Gobuty Development Co, LLC*
  • Metro West Housing Solutions
  • MHI-Austin
  • MHI – McGuyer Home Builders- DFW
  • Msheireb Properties
  • National Church Residences
  • Natural & Built Environments, LLC*
  • ROEM Builders
  • Sotramont
  • The Dinerstein Companies
  • The Hudson Companies
  • Uptown Rentals
  • Urban Development Partners

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is the world’s most widely used rating system for green buildings. The LEED for Homes rating system was created in 2008 as a way for single-family homes and multi-family buildings to achieve LEED certification. LEED for Homes projects undergoes a technically rigorous process to become certified, including multiple on-site inspections and diagnostic tests. Quality control and quality assurance are built into the process so that builders, architects, and homeowners can rest assured they get what they paid for and specified. More than 1.2 million residential units are currently participating in LEED. USGBC’s 2015 Green Building Economic Impact Study found that the residential green construction market is expected to grow from $55 million in 2015 to $100.4 million in 2018, representing a year-over-year growth of 24.5 percent.

To learn more about LEED for Homes, visit https://www.usgbc.org/guide/homes.

Human Performance Measured in Buildings

Aclima’s Scott Andrews talks about designing for IAQ data.

This article is written by Scott Andrews, LEED AP BD+C, Director, Aclima, Inc. In this series, speakers from USGBC Northern California’s GreenerBuilder conference, held July 13, 2017, at the Zero Net Energy Center in San Leandro, share insights from their sessions. Interested in supporting GreenerBuilder 2018 as an event sponsor or exhibitor? Please contact Brenden McEneaney.

USGBC’s Pacific Regional Director, Brenden McEneaney, and the President and CEO of USGBC and GBCI, Mahesh Ramanujam, kicked off GreenerBuilder 2017 with two very important concepts: First, that we must remember that green buildings are always about people, and second, that data is a natural resource in itself. Therefore, it was fitting that the first session of the morning, “Science and Practice of Measuring Human Performance in Buildings,” focused on the collection and application of environmental data to improve our buildings for people, who spend up to 90 percent of their days living, working and learning indoors.

Recent research shows that there is an undeniable correlation between measurable indoor air quality (IAQ) conditions and human cognition. This unleashes an entirely new set of economic considerations in managing commercial property. With new definitions of what constitutes an optimal indoor environment, tenants are beginning to look past aesthetics to the sizeable economic gains that healthier office environments can offer. This session, which included Lane Burt (North America Lead for Buildings Alive), Simon Turner (President and CEO of Healthy Buildings), and moderator Scott Andrews (a director at Aclima), took the audience through the science to the economics and into practice.

And fortunately, just as the deep relationship between IAQ and human health and wellness is becoming more widely understood, so too are our desires and abilities to empower facility managers to gather reliable, hyperlocal data to optimize building environments for health and well-being. The panel explored the question of how we will design, construct and operate buildings in five years. It was proposed that buildings might look more like a computer, with software controlling the building and adjusting to climate, health and other conditions in real time to optimize spaces for our most important resource: our people.

Although the panel agreed that some version of this new era of smart buildings may soon be a reality for many properties, thanks to the democratization of data that companies like Aclima are delivering to the marketplace, it will remain an imperative to train our facility managers. After all, not all aspects of a building can be automated, and this newly available data is only as valuable as the people and systems in place to analyze and apply it. FM, along with their consultants and internal teams, represent the critical last-mile delivery service for applying data analytics to make IAQ improvements and co-optimize the indoor environment and energy performance.

Distributed real-time sensor networks with parameters like CO2, VOCs, and comfort indicators such as temperature and sound levels represent the missing meter to measure how our buildings turn energy and water inputs into desired outputs. This includes a close review of building systems and potential outside factors that could impact IAQ, which can also be measured with on-site outdoor sensing equipment. There is a need to connect good intentions with measured outcomes, and new products and services are making this possible like never before.

Materials strategies in LEED v4

At Greenbuild 2017, get the info you need on materials credits for LEED v4.

The topic of materials is one that spans every phase of a building’s life cycle. It includes considerations of construction waste, specifying materials for the building’s structure in the design and construction phase, making green cleaning choices while the building is in use and determining what happens to the building in the demolition phase.

Quick facts about construction waste:

  • Construction and demolition waste constitutes about 40 percent of the total solid waste stream in the United States and about 25 percent of the total waste stream in the European Union.
  • In aggregate, LEED projects are responsible for diverting more than 80 million tons of waste from landfills, and this volume is expected to grow to 540 million tons by 2030.

Materials decisions are impacted by an array of stakeholders who work with the built environment and those who support it, as well as by those who work, learn, live and play within those buildings.

LEED projects divert more than 80 million tons of waste from landfills

What LEED does with materials

Since its initial launch, LEED has always addressed materials, and the newest version of the rating system is no different. LEED v4 brings a shift that goes beyond materials decisions focusing on single attributes and moves the market toward conversations about optimizing environmental, social and health impacts and gaining a better understanding of the trade-offs.

The LEED Building Design and Construction materials credits and prerequisites include:

  • Prerequisite: Storage and Collection of Recyclables
  • Prerequisite: Construction and Demolition Waste Management Planning
  • Prerequisite: PBT Source Reduction—Mercury
  • Credit (5–6 points): Building Life-Cycle Impact Reduction
  • Credit (2 points): Building Product Disclosure and Optimization—Environmental Product Declarations
  • Credit (2 points): Building Product Disclosure and Optimization—Sourcing of Raw Materials
  • Credit (2 points): Building Product Disclosure and Optimization—Material Ingredients
  • Credit (1 point): PBT Source Reduction—Mercury
  • Credit (2 points): PBT Source Reduction—Lead, Cadmium, and Copper
  • Credit (2 points): Furniture and Medical Furnishings
  • Credit (1 point): Design for Flexibility
  • Credit (2 points): Construction and Demolition Waste Management

The LEED Operations and Maintenance materials credits and prerequisites include:

  • Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy
  • Prerequisite: Facility Maintenance and Renovation Policy
  • Credit (1 point): Purchasing—Ongoing
  • Credit (1 point): Purchasing—Lamps
  • Credit (2 points): Purchasing—Facility Management and Renovation
  • Credit (2 points): Solid Waste Management—Ongoing
  • Credit (2 points): Solid Waste Management—Facility Maintenance and Renovation

Join USGBC at Greenbuild 2017 in BostonIndia, and China, to learn more about LEED and materials. In addition to educations sessions, Greenbuild in Boston and India will feature Expo halls where attendees can interact with the newest and most innovative products the market has to offer.

The Boston Greenbuild event will also include a special session on LEED v4 and its materials and resources section:

Course: LEED v4 and Materials: Interactive Session

Thurs., November 9 from 5–6 p.m.

How LEED combats climate change

One of the goals that guided the development of LEED v4 was reversing a LEED building’s contribution to global climate change.

The Earth’s climate is changing, and 97 percent of climate scientists agree that it is likely due to human activities. So where does that leave us and the rest of the building industry?

Buildings account for more than one-quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), according to the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction. Add in other infrastructure and activities, such as transportation, that is associated with buildings, and that number jumps.

By building green, we can reduce the impact our buildings have on contributing to climate change, while also building resilience into our homes and communities.

LEED vs climate change

One of the goals that guided the development of LEED v4 was reversing a LEED building’s contribution to global climate change. High-performing green buildings, particularly LEED-certified buildings, play a key role in reducing the negative climate impacts of the built environment. For this reason, 35 of the 100 total points in LEED v4 are distributed to reward climate change mitigation strategies.

The LEED process addresses a structure’s planning, design, construction, operations and end of life as well as considering energy, water, indoor environmental quality, materials selection, and location. Green buildings reduce landfill waste, enable alternative transportation use and encourage retention and creation of vegetated land areas and roofs.

LEED rewards thoughtful decisions about building location, with credits that encourage compact development and connection with transit and amenities. When a building consumes less water, the energy otherwise required to withdraw, treat and pump that water from the source to the building are avoided. Additionally, less transport of materials to and from the building cuts associated fuel consumption.

Here are some of the ways that LEED weighs the various credits and strategies so that LEED projects can mitigate their contribution to global climate change:

  • GHG Emissions Reduction from Building Operations Energy Use: To target energy use reductions directly associated with building operations. This includes all building systems and operations within the building or associated grounds that rely on electricity or other fuel sources for energy consumption.
  • GHG Emissions Reduction from Transportation Energy Use: To target energy use reductions associated with the transportation of building occupants, employees, customers, visitors, business travel, etc.
  • GHG Emissions Reduction from the Embodied Energy of Materials and Water Use: To target GHG-emissions reductions associated with the energy use and processes required in the extraction, production, transportation, conveyance, manufacturing, assembly, distribution, use, posttreatment, and disposal of materials, products, and processed water. Any measures that directly reduce the use of potable water, non-potable water, or raw materials (e.g. reduced packaging, building reuse) will indirectly reduce energy as well because of the embodied energy associated with these product life cycles.
  • GHG Emissions Reduction from a Cleaner Energy Supply: To target actions and measures that support a cleaner, fewer GHG-emissions intensive energy supply and a greater reliance on renewable sources of energy.
  • Global Warming Potential Reduction from Non-Energy Related Drivers: To address the non-energy related climate change drivers (e.g. albedo, carbon sinks, non-energy related GHG emissions) and identifies actions that reduce these contributions to climate change (e.g. land use changes, heat island reduction, reforestation, refrigerant purchases).

Some of the top credits in LEED v4 BD+C, ID+C, and O+M that are associated with mitigating global climate change:

  • LT Credit: Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses
  • LT Credit: Access to Quality Transit / Alternative Transportation
  • WE Credit: Outdoor Water Use Reduction
  • WE Credit: Indoor Water Use Reduction
  • EA Credit: Optimize Energy Performance
  • EA Credit: Renewable Energy Production / Renewable Energy and Carbon Offsets
  • EA Credit: Enhanced Refrigerant Management
  • EA Credit: Green Power and Carbon Offsets
  • MR Credit: Building Life-Cycle Impact Reduction / Interiors Life-Cycle Impact Reduction

How LEED combats climate change

One of the goals that guided the development of LEED v4 was reversing a LEED building’s contribution to global climate change.

The Earth’s climate is changing, and 97 percent of climate scientists agree that it is likely due to human activities. So where does that leave us and the rest of the building industry?

Buildings account for more than one-quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), according to the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction. Add in other infrastructure and activities, such as transportation, that is associated with buildings, and that number jumps.

By building green, we can reduce the impact our buildings have on contributing to climate change, while also building resilience into our homes and communities.

LEED vs climate change

One of the goals that guided the development of LEED v4 was reversing a LEED building’s contribution to global climate change. High-performing green buildings, particularly LEED-certified buildings, play a key role in reducing the negative climate impacts of the built environment. For this reason, 35 of the 100 total points in LEED v4 are distributed to reward climate change mitigation strategies.

The LEED process addresses a structure’s planning, design, construction, operations and end of life as well as considering energy, water, indoor environmental quality, materials selection, and location. Green buildings reduce landfill waste, enable alternative transportation use and encourage retention and creation of vegetated land areas and roofs.

LEED rewards thoughtful decisions about building location, with credits that encourage compact development and connection with transit and amenities. When a building consumes less water, the energy otherwise required to withdraw, treat and pump that water from the source to the building are avoided. Additionally, less transport of materials to and from the building cuts associated fuel consumption.

Here are some of the ways that LEED weighs the various credits and strategies so that LEED projects can mitigate their contribution to global climate change:

  • GHG Emissions Reduction from Building Operations Energy Use: To target energy use reductions directly associated with building operations. This includes all building systems and operations within the building or associated grounds that rely on electricity or other fuel sources for energy consumption.
  • GHG Emissions Reduction from Transportation Energy Use: To target energy use reductions associated with the transportation of building occupants, employees, customers, visitors, business travel, etc.
  • GHG Emissions Reduction from the Embodied Energy of Materials and Water Use: To target GHG-emissions reductions associated with the energy use and processes required in the extraction, production, transportation, conveyance, manufacturing, assembly, distribution, use, posttreatment, and disposal of materials, products, and processed water. Any measures that directly reduce the use of potable water, non-potable water, or raw materials (e.g. reduced packaging, building reuse) will indirectly reduce energy as well because of the embodied energy associated with these product life cycles.
  • GHG Emissions Reduction from a Cleaner Energy Supply: To target actions and measures that support a cleaner, fewer GHG-emissions intensive energy supply and a greater reliance on renewable sources of energy.
  • Global Warming Potential Reduction from Non-Energy Related Drivers: To address the non-energy related climate change drivers (e.g. albedo, carbon sinks, non-energy related GHG emissions) and identifies actions that reduce these contributions to climate change (e.g. land use changes, heat island reduction, reforestation, refrigerant purchases).

Some of the top credits in LEED v4 BD+C, ID+C, and O+M that are associated with mitigating global climate change:

  • LT Credit: Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses
  • LT Credit: Access to Quality Transit / Alternative Transportation
  • WE Credit: Outdoor Water Use Reduction
  • WE Credit: Indoor Water Use Reduction
  • EA Credit: Optimize Energy Performance
  • EA Credit: Renewable Energy Production / Renewable Energy and Carbon Offsets
  • EA Credit: Enhanced Refrigerant Management
  • EA Credit: Green Power and Carbon Offsets
  • MR Credit: Building Life-Cycle Impact Reduction / Interiors Life-Cycle Impact Reduction

To learn more about LEED and how it can help reduce the impact of global climate change, head to Greenbuild in Boston this November 8–10 (or check out our Greenbuild events in China or India). Greenbuild features LEED workshops, hundreds of green building educational sessions and inspiring speakers and events

High-performing buildings offer solutions for Virginia’s Climate Action Challenge

Published on 31 Aug 2016 Written by Nick Brousse Posted in Advocacy and policy

The state of Virginia continues to up the ante in its energy efficiency initiatives.

Earlier this summer, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe took a bold step toward combating climate change in the Commonwealth. To reduce carbon pollution from the state’s power plants, Gov. McAuliffe signed Executive Order 57, setting in motion a process to accelerate efforts to improve energy efficiency and expand the state’s clean energy portfolio.

The Commonwealth is off to a running start, recently announcing the issuing of permits for two utility-scale solar facilities that will power nearly 6,000 homes. However, when it comes to helping residents achieve the benefits of living in energy-efficient homes to help achieve carbon reduction goals, Virginia’s leaders need not look further than the state’s own Housing Development Authority (VHDA).

In recent years, VHDA has implemented some of the nation’s most impressive standards for energy efficiency in affordable housing, relying on third-party green building standards like LEED® and EarthCraft. The Virginia Center for Housing Research at Virginia Tech found that over the past five years, every applicant receiving highly sought-after Low Income Housing Tax Credits managed by VHDA have been committed to meeting these two green building standards.

The payback has been huge. Research examining 15 recently constructed or rehabbed apartment communities throughout the state built to these higher standards were found to use 40 percent less energy than housing built to existing code requirements. The average tenant in these communities saved 464 kilowatt hours of energy per month, equaling $54 per month on utility bills—a savings of over $600 per year. For seniors and families struggling to make ends meet, savings from energy efficiency is a lifeline.

With more than 1,000 LEED-certified projects encompassing nearly 135 million square feet in the commonwealth, Virginia businesses and residents recognize the benefits of LEED. By allowing lower utility expenses, reduced operations and maintenance costs and third-party verification providing assurance, LEED is helping Virginia scale up and enjoy the benefits of environmentally sustainable design. As the state looks for additional policies to drive energy efficiency even further across the economy.

Nick Brousse

Virginia will improve energy efficiency to cut carbon emissions

Published on 30 Jun 2016Written by Nick Brousse Posted in Advocacy and policy

Virginia’s Executive Order 57 aims to reduce carbon pollution from state power plants.

On June 28, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe signed Executive Order 57, a major step forward in combating climate change by reducing carbon pollution from the state’s power plants. The order directs Secretary of Natural Resources Molly Ward to convene a workgroup that will recommend steps to build upon existing efforts to improve energy efficiency and expand the state’s clean energy portfolio.

In a nod to the power of energy efficiency to reduce carbon emissions and utility bills, Gov. McAuliffe said, “We all understand that the cheapest kilowatt of energy is the one we do not consume.” The state has more than 1,000 LEED-certified projects encompassing nearly 135 million square feet of commercial, residential, manufacturing, educational, health care and other facility space. Virginia residents recognize the benefits of LEED and the positive impact green construction has on the triple bottom line—people, planet and profit. 

“Energy efficiency creates jobs, saves families and businesses money, and helps reduce pollution and carbon emissions—all benefits that the Commonwealth deserves from economic, energy and environmental initiatives like Executive Order 57,” the Governor continued.

The 2015 Green Building Economic Impact Study found that the green building sector in the U.S. is outpacing conventional construction growth and will account for more than 2.3 million American jobs this year. According to the report, LEED-certified construction in the Commonwealth alone is projected to account for 107,000 jobs and to contribute $9.39 billion in gross domestic product between 2015 and 2018.

Nick Brousse

Advocacy & Policy Project Manager

 

The greening of Pittsburgh: Next up, schools

Published on 1 Apr 2016Written by Rick FedrizziPosted in Center for Green Schools

LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is a USGBC metric that measures the sustainability of a building’s design, construction, operations and maintenance in terms of energy, water and resource use; waste and emissions reduction; indoor environmental quality; and innovative approaches to the development process.

Pittsburgh has proved it’s ready to take on the challenge of environmental responsibility and climate change in meaningful, long-lasting ways. It has transformed the buildings that we rely on every day to use energy and water in smart, ecologically sensible ways.

Our nation’s schools are in terrible shape. Across all 50 states—Pennsylvania included—students are going to schools that are in dire need of repair and are failing to create healthy and safe environments for our kids and the teachers and administrators who support them.

The dichotomy of Pittsburgh—green public buildings but deteriorating schools—is emblematic of the challenge facing the nation. And it’s why the U.S. Green Building Council held its Green Schools Conference there.

The council’s 2016 “State of Our Schools” report, an in-depth state-by-state analysis of our country’s investment in school infrastructure, has found our funding structure inherently and persistently inequitable. Millions of students around the country are learning in dilapidated, obsolete and unhealthy facilities that are obstacles to their learning and well-being.

Pennsylvania state government contributes only 15 percent of school districts’ total spending on school construction and facility upkeep. Every school district is expected to make up the difference for their students—and not every district has the same amount of money to spend

With the school-district budgets so overstretched, it’s understandable that things slip through the cracks. But our schools are too important to put on the back burner. Making schools healthier isn’t just a matter of supporting Pittsburgh’s admirable legacy of sustainable building. It’s about providing a healthy, safe environment for our children and ensuring that they are the recipients of a 21st century education.

Pittsburgh’s story is built on the idea of coming together in the classroom. The Green Schools Conference is a chance to learn from each other and build a better future for our kids, one that’s healthy, safe and sustainable.

Rick Fedrizzi

CEO & Founding Chairman U.S. Green Building Council

Member employees, USGBC staff, USGBC board

 

World’s second largest building

Shanghai Tower, achieves LEED Platinum

Published on 14 Dec 2015Written by Joseph Crea Posted in LEED

Shanghai Tower, the tallest building in China and the second tallest in the world, recently achieved LEED Platinum for Core and Shell. The Tower, located at the core of Pudong’s growing Lujiazui finance and trade area in Shanghai, is 632 meters high.

“As the tallest and one of the greenest landmarks in China, Shanghai Tower shows China’s responsibility and commitment to the world to improve the environment and boost the health of its people,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, Chief Operating Officer of USGBC. “Every story about LEED is a story about leadership, and leaders across the globe understand that LEED is a powerful tool that accelerates global market transformation of our built environment.”

The tower is a green building powerhouse buoyed not only by LEED, but also by China Three Star certification, which was awarded by China’s Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development (MOHURD).

LEED has facilitated advances in building technologies, integrated design and operating practices, as well as saving building cost. LEED-certified buildings are estimated to save as much as $1.2 billion in energy, $149.5 million in water, $715.3 million in maintenance and $54.2 million in waste for the U.S. market from 2015 to 2018.

LEED Platinum certification will save significantly on costs for Shanghai Tower. For example, among all its intelligent building control systems, the lighting system alone will save more than $556,000 each year in energy

Joseph Crea

Director, International Marketing and Communications

USGBC and GBCI Collaborate with Shougang to Further LEED Green Buildings in China

Published on 18 Nov 2015Written by Marisa Long Posted in Media

New 833 hectare Beijing development aims to be “world model” of green city

Washington, D.C. (18 Nov 2015) – The U.S. Green Building Council and Green Business Certification Inc. signed into a collaboration with Beijing-based Shougang, one of China’s largest steel companies and Fortune 500 company. The partnership aims to incorporate LEED, the WELL Building System and other green building rating systems into a new, mixed-use development on an old factory site spanning 833 hectares, in addition to creating an ongoing collaboration around LEED in China, education in the green building arena and workforce development.

Named the “New Shougang High-End Industry Comprehensive Service District,” the project seeks to transform an old factory heritage site in Beijing into a “new comprehensive service provider” combining infrastructure, district development, industrial layout and ecological harmony for financial and health care services, culture and sports, among others. Through the development, Shougang hopes to achieve a “green Beijing” to serve as a national example of green innovation in the construction of low-carbon ecological Chinese cities while being a world model of green building certification for industrial heritage renovations. Shougang has 20 more similar projects in China currently in development.

“The market for green building in Greater China has seen extraordinary growth since its first LEED project earned certification in 2005,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, chief operating officer, USGBC, and president, Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI).

LEED has facilitated advances in building technologies, integrated design and operating practices, as well as the tremendous growth of the green building sector, especially in China, the second largest market for LEED in the world outside the U.S. with 118.3 million gross square meters of space participating in the LEED green building rating system.

The green building industry contributes more than $134.3 billion in labor income in the U.S. and by 2018, the industry’s direct contribution to U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is also expected to reach $303.5 billion.

Marisa Long

Public Relations & Communications DirectorU.S. Green Building Council

USGBC staff

 

 

Page 1 of 3123»

LEED Certification

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a non profit organization that certifies sustainable businesses, homes, hospitals, schools, and neighborhoods. USGBC is dedicated to expanding green building practices and education, and its LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System™.

Chemline, Inc. is a member of The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and has the potential to provide LEED points.