Manufacturer of Boiler & Cooling Water Treatment Chemicals

Posts Tagged ‘Water Management’

300 years of water management in Boston

Ahead of WaterBuild, learn a bit about the history of water management in Boston.

Water has played a critical role in shaping Boston since the city’s founding. From the earliest settlers to today’s developers of high-performance green buildings, managing water has been a consistent theme for Bostonians and for leaders of the Bay State.

At Greenbuild 2017, the WaterBuild summit digs deep into the topic of water infrastructure in Boston by keeping three themes in mind: sustainability, resilience, and risk. Attendees will discuss equity, quality and technology and how they each intersect with water and modern society. Before you join us for education and connection, here’s some background on Boston’s water history

A waterworks is born

The Pilgrims relocated from Charlestown to Boston in order to access a clean source of fresh water for their community. As the population grew and the spring could no longer supply the residents with ample resources, the first private waterworks system in the New World was created.

Using wooden pipes, reservoirs were able to supply water for everyday consumption. In 1796, entrepreneurs created the Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Company with the hope of providing water to all Bostonians. The aqueduct was relatively expensive and relied on gravity for distribution, which meant that due to elevation, residents in the North End and Beacon Hill areas were at a disadvantage, as well as those who did not have the financial means to take advantage of this service. Interestingly, those at higher elevation were also at a lower risk for other water resilience hazards that are prevalent today.

Serving the public good

The 1820s marked the beginning of the discussion for implementing a public municipal water system. This conversation lasted several decades, due to competing interests, but in 1848, a municipal system was established to serve the city. It would be called Boston Water Works.

The need for safe water grew exponentially as more immigrants migrated to Boston. In 1895, the Metropolitan Water Act created a new approach for supplying water to towns within 10 miles of the state house, which was the birthplace of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA). This system continues to serve over 2.5 million people in the greater Boston area.

It wasn’t until the 21st century that the original aqueduct was reinforced with a redundant line to help supply ample water to 61 communities in and around Boston. The 17.6-mile, $665 million projects, called the Metrowest Tunnel, is now increasing water flow into Boston.

A fresh look

Boston’s water history is long and complex. At WaterBuild, professionals from Boston, across the industry, and around the world will talk about water risks and opportunities in 2017 and beyond. Join us there to learn more from some of the brightest minds in the fields of resilient and sustainable community planning, water cycle management, risk mitigation and green building.

LEED Certification

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a non profit organization that certifies sustainable businesses, homes, hospitals, schools, and neighborhoods. USGBC is dedicated to expanding green building practices and education, and its LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System™.

Chemline, Inc. is a member of The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and has the potential to provide LEED points.